You are here

Blog Safety Topics: Medication

Main Content
medication blog 2015

Poison Prevention Week is March 15 – 21, and Safe Kids is releasing new research, “Medicine Safety for Children: An In-Depth Look at Calls to Poison Centers,” to explore medicine safety for children. In partnership with the American Association of Poison Control Centers, and with support from McNeil Consumer Healthcare, we analyzed more than 547,000 calls to poison centers to better understand what types of medicines little kids and teens are getting into and how it happens.

home safety for kids

With people still talking about the Nationwide Super Bowl ad that brought dramatic attention to the number one killer of kids, preventable injuries, we’re releasing new research that reveals the scope of the problem in a place most parents assume is safe: the home. Every day, six children die from an injury in the home, and 10,000 go to the emergency department for the kinds of injuries that commonly happen in homes.

medicine safe dosing blog

We talk a lot about safe storage and the importance of keeping medicine up and away, out of reach of children. And that’s important: In 67 percent of emergency room visits for medicine poisoning, the medicine was left within reach of a child, such as in a purse, on a counter or dresser or on the ground.

What is equally important, though, is safe dosing.

Medicine bottle to illustrate medication safety

Grandparents are playing a bigger role than ever before in raising their grandkids. More than 7 million grandparents in the United States live with their grandchildren, and 13 percent of grandparents are relied on to be a trusted caregiver.

Medication safety

Every year during National Poison Prevention Week (March 17 - 23), I think of my younger brother, Jim. And sometimes I even call to remind him of what happened 30 years ago.

medication safety

According to the family historian, I was not to be trusted.

At age two, I had been left alone for about a minute when I was discovered sitting in my parents' bedroom with a bottle of aspirin -- cap off, bottle upended, contents strewn about. (Clever girl!)