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Brandon Bass

I’m a big guy. At six foot eight, it’s hard to believe that there is much of anything that scares me. What’s more, I’m an athlete. My entire life, I’ve been taught to put myself out there and take chances on the court. When I joined the NBA in 2005, I took the skills that I developed in college to the next level. Playing on the professional level you can’t allow yourself to be intimidated by other players or the pressure of the cheering crowds.

Yet, just because I’m fearless on the court doesn’t mean that I’m fearless in my everyday life. In fact, even something fun and seemingly harmless like a swimming pool can scare me. The truth is—I never learned to swim as a child. I may be able to score a career playoff high of 27 points for the Boston Celtics, but if you threw me into the ocean, I’d drown.

Youth Football Concussions

My son, Murphy, is passionate about playing football. Along with that passion comes bumps, bruises, and a fair share of helmet clashing. The physical intensity and risk of injury rises each year as he ages, and his practice schedule is a grueling 6-8 hour-per-week regimen. Murphy managed to play relatively injury free until well into his third year in 2012.

happy family

This is National Childhood Injury Prevention Week, which means it’s a great time to brush up on a few of the easiest things parents can do to keep their kids safe. When it comes to safety for your children, you already know the basics: buckle up, wear a helmet, learn to swim, look both ways. Here are some lesser-known – but just as important – tips to help keep your family safe.

Change every diaper. That’s my first piece of advice for one of my best friends, Muppus, who just had a healthy baby boy. (We call him Muppus because that was the name of his band in high school.) I’ve benefited from the advice of Muppus on so many extremely important things – like how to build the perfect fort — so I thought sharing all the things I learned as a parent of two boys might be a nice way to pay him back.

We were delighted recently when our partners at Safe Kids China asked us to visit and conduct a child passenger safety certification course in Shanghai. Our goal was to teach and certify health and safety professionals in Shanghai about the benefits of using child safety restraints in the car.

Only an estimated 2-3 percent of the population in China have or use car seats. But things are starting to change. A newly passed law will go into effect soon in Shanghai that will require children under 4 to ride in car seats. This is huge step in the right direction.

J&J sports safety blog

In May 2013, my eleven year-old son Giovanni was pitching for his little league baseball team in Staten Island, New York. It was the bottom of the fifth inning. He had already struck out two batters and the third batter, about a foot taller than my son, was on deck. Giovanni’s first pitch went right down the middle of the plate. The batter swung and hit, and the ball hit my son in the face.

Sports Safety Blog

For many kids, back to school means back to sports. Youth sports are, and should always be, a valuable experience, filled with challenges, competition and fun. But too many kids are stuck on the sidelines because of an injury that is preventable. In 2013, 1.24 million kids sustained a sports injury severe enough to go to the emergency room.

We conducted a survey of parents, coaches and young athletes to explore how the current culture of sports may be leading to unnecessary injuries, and how that culture needs to change.

ssports safety landing blog

There’s nothing that feels worse for young athletes than getting hurt and having to sit on the sidelines while their team goes on to victory. Our new report, “Changing the Culture of Youth Sports,” explores how the culture of youth sports may be keeping kids out of the game. Here's a look at what parents, coaches and athletes need to know.

Brie Boothby

"In a moment my life changed forever. I went from a highly-motivated and optimistic teenage athlete to an anxious girl plagued with constant headaches struggling just to get through a day."

Brie was a healthy high school athlete until an injury during a game left her with a concussion that changed her life.

Buckle Up Blog

Yesterday began, as it does for so many of us college students, with a cup of coffee and a click of the seatbelt. But after a typical work day, things took a pretty abrupt turn when I got into a car crash on my way home.

Dustin Gessert receives a Badge of Courage Award

From his pictures, Dustin Gessert looks like he and actor Bradley Cooper were separated at birth. But Gessert, an officer with the Wisconsin Rapids Police Department, made his own headlines recently as the leading man in a rescue story.

On an 85-degree day at the end of May, Officer Gessert was responding to an unrelated child welfare 911 call when he came across what could have been a tragic situation. He had to look twice before he saw the small boy, left alone in a car.

 

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