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Keeping Teens Safe on the Streets

It seems that teens are texting or tapping on their phones no matter where they are. I know. I am the parent of a high school senior. Unfortunately, cell phonesand other handheld gadgets are causing teens to be more easily distracted, and that is leading to greater risk on the roads. There is a lot of attention on distracted driving, but what about kids who are walkers? While it might seem that as kids get older they’ll become safer while walking, teenagers are now the most at-risk pedestrians of children 19 and under. In fact, every hour of every day, a teen pedestrian is killed or injured in the U.S. after being hit by a car, bike or motorcycle.

Walking Backwards Blog

If there is one thing I know about myself, it’s that I am not the most coordinated person. I know this because I ran cross-country in high school, and I still have the scars to prove it. Even the smallest branch or bump in the road used to be enough to bring me tumbling to the ground in spectacular fashion.

This tradition of tumbling continued when I left for college and became a tour guide. If you have ever been on a tour of a college campus, you can imagine that it is not the best job for the uncoordinated. Leading the tours required me to walk backwards in front of large groups of people. On my very first tour as a freshly-minted guide, I ran into no less than five tree branches and several innocent bystanders, not to mention nearly being struck by a passing car.

unstoppable moms

This autumn, Safe Kids is teaming up with MOTRIN® and Kelly Ripa to celebrate moms everywhere and the things that make them unstoppable. Visit the MOTRIN® Facebook page to share your best mom tips from now until December 31st.

Winston Sullivan

"Mommy, I have a great idea. After school, you can pick me up and we can walk to town and get some ice cream."

My 4-year-old son, Winston, says this nearly every day during our morning commute.

It sounds so Mayberry, doesn't it? 

car seat blog

How tall is your child? We know exactly what babies weigh and how long they are, but most parents I know couldn't tell you the exact height of their child as they grow older. There is one height, however, that every parent of young children needs to know: 4'9" (57 inches).

girl in booster seat

Our new study helps answer some of the questions parents have about when to switch from a booster seat to just a seat belt. We surveyed 1,000 parents of children ages 4 to 10 and found that an alarming number of parents are allowing kids to use a seat belt alone before they are big enough. In fact, 7 in 10 parents do not know that a child should be at least 57 inches (4’9”) to ride in a car without a booster seat.

Trooper Jason Sylvester

I’m a state trooper, a certified child passenger safety technician and a father of four kids under the age of 11, so I understand the importance of safety seats. I’ll never forget the day in March 2014, when I saw for myself just how important they are. I was volunteering at a car seat inspection at the Fabius-Park Township fire department, just outside of Three Rivers, Mich. The forecast that day was for rain and snow. Ice had already started covering the roads.

happy family

This is National Childhood Injury Prevention Week, which means it’s a great time to brush up on a few of the easiest things parents can do to keep their kids safe. When it comes to safety for your children, you already know the basics: buckle up, wear a helmet, learn to swim, look both ways. Here are some lesser-known – but just as important – tips to help keep your family safe.

We were delighted recently when our partners at Safe Kids China asked us to visit and conduct a child passenger safety certification course in Shanghai. Our goal was to teach and certify health and safety professionals in Shanghai about the benefits of using child safety restraints in the car.

Only an estimated 2-3 percent of the population in China have or use car seats. But things are starting to change. A newly passed law will go into effect soon in Shanghai that will require children under 4 to ride in car seats. This is huge step in the right direction.

Sports Safety Blog

For many kids, back to school means back to sports. Youth sports are, and should always be, a valuable experience, filled with challenges, competition and fun. But too many kids are stuck on the sidelines because of an injury that is preventable. In 2013, 1.24 million kids sustained a sports injury severe enough to go to the emergency room.

We conducted a survey of parents, coaches and young athletes to explore how the current culture of sports may be leading to unnecessary injuries, and how that culture needs to change.

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