Hot stove tops can cause fires and injuries

By Rob Pickle, with an intro by his Mom, Martha Wilcox

Can you tell when your kid is telling you the truth? Our kids have no idea what experts we become in watching their expressions; after all we’ve been doing it since the day they were born. “I didn’t eat the cookie,” may be declared with conviction by a 3-year-old, but the crumbs on the chin tell another story.

Emmett Rauch

But Emmett is not alone. According to the National Poison Control, 3,500 children each year suffer from a button battery accident. Eleven deaths have been reported. That’s why I want to share our story. To help other parents learn about button batteries and how to prevent similar tragedies.

Sydney Chance

I never knew that a TV or piece of furniture could be dangerous to kids. Before the accident, we secured our flat screen TV to the wall in the living room. I didn’t know that we should also secure our old TV in Brandon’s room or even the dresser on which it stood.

choking safety

Here at Safe Kids, we often hear from parents who have faced the heartbreaking loss of a child. You will want to read this story by Gordon and Julie Ross, loving parents who are eager to share their story so other parents can learn from their tragedy.

-Torine Creppy, Chief Program Officer for the United States

home safety

Sadly, between 2008 and 2010, over 22,000 children age 9 and younger were injured by preventable furniture tip-overs or instability. Lisa Marie, a parent advocate who has been working with Safe Kids, graciously shares her heartbreaking story of her son Shane.

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