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home safety

I’m writing to you today with a heavy heart. This holiday weekend when most of us were celebrating the 4th of July, a home in Lancaster, Pennsylvania experienced a devastating fire. Three adults and four children died in this home fire. There were no smoke alarms in the home.

Hundreds of families and kids of all ages swept through the fabulous Highline Stages in New York City on May 18 for the first national Safe Kids Day family event.

But Emmett is not alone. According to the National Poison Control, 3,500 children each year suffer from a button battery accident. Eleven deaths have been reported. That’s why I want to share our story. To help other parents learn about button batteries and how to prevent similar tragedies.

I never knew that a TV or piece of furniture could be dangerous to kids. Before the accident, we secured our flat screen TV to the wall in the living room. I didn’t know that we should also secure our old TV in Brandon’s room or even the dresser on which it stood.

Our hearts go out to the millions of families who were affected by Hurricane Sandy. We are so grateful to emergency personnel who are working around the clock to make things better.

If there is one thing this “storm of the century” has taught us, it’s the importance of planning ahead and being safe.

As a longtime member of the Safe Kids staff I was pretty familiar with child safety, long before I became Stephen’s dad 17 months ago, Back then, I didn’t realize the impact Safe Kids would have on my new role as parent.

Our partners at the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) are dedicated to educating children and families about fire safety. Now that it’s National Fire Prevention Week, USFA Fire Program Specialist Teresa Neal wanted to share a few messages and one very important challenge.

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