See how Safe Kids and the CDC say the US can improve upon road crash rates.

Parents learn of car seat information through a variety of trusted sources. The information may or may not reflect best practice but can grab attention because it sounds so easy to do and uses simple language. Safe Kids CPS  Training Manager and Technical Advisor Lorrie Walker weighs in on the matter. 

The weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day are arguably the busiest of the year. Families are planning trips to visit relatives, searching for thoughtful gifts, preparing special meals and many other tasks to make the holidays the most wonderful time of the year.

While recognizing that driving a car is very serious business, officials hope that these signs will be more than one-time reminders to drivers. In addition to making people laugh, they hope these attention-grabbing signs will be family conversation starters, and help create more long-term safe driving habits.

My hope is that this PSA inspires parents, kids, caretakers and anyone else who watches it to do the little things that can make a big difference. Something as simple as buckling a car seat or checking the batteries in a smoke alarm can change the news and make a world of difference for parents, families and communities around the world. 

For too long, global road safety has not received the priority it deserves, especially when it comes to the needs of children. Not only are children at high risk in vehicles, on bicycles, and in some countries on motorcycles, they are vulnerable as pedestrians and are often injured or killed in the simple act of walking to school.

Every day around the world, more than 500 children lose their lives in traffic crashes. Tens of thousands are injured, sometimes suffering lifelong disabilities. Not only are children at high risk in vehicles, on bicycles, and on motorcycles, they are vulnerable as pedestrians and are often injured or killed in the simple act of walking to school.

Our new study helps answer some of the questions parents have about when to switch from a booster seat to just a seat belt. We surveyed 1,000 parents of children ages 4 to 10 and found that an alarming number of parents are allowing kids to use a seat belt alone before they are big enough. In fact, 7 in 10 parents do not know that a child should be at least 57 inches (4’9”) to ride in a car without a booster seat.

Yesterday began, as it does for so many of us college students, with a cup of coffee and a click of the seatbelt. But after a typical work day, things took a pretty abrupt turn when I got into a car crash on my way home.

"I lost my best friend because we didn't buckle up."

No one starts their day anticipating getting into a car crash. But teens like Presley teach us that it only takes one time riding in a car without bucking up for a life to be changed forever.